Volume 7, Issue 6, December 2019, Page: 135-140
Experimental Study of Destructive Distillation of Maiganga Coal: Analysis of Products’ Yield and Composition
Habu Iyodo Mohammed, Department of Chemical Engineering University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Ali Lawan Yaumi, Department of Chemical Engineering University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Alhaji Shehu Grema, Department of Chemical Engineering University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Murtala Musa Ahmed, Department of Chemical Engineering University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Abubakar M ohammed El-Jummah, Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 26, 2020;       Accepted: Feb. 10, 2020;       Published: Feb. 14, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajche.20190706.12      View  68      Downloads  76
Abstract
The research involves destructive distillation of Maiganga coal, analysis of the yields and characterization of condensable products. Maiganga coal was distillated in a pyrolyser, the condensable products were recovered in a three stage separator, and the products were collected over a range of temperatures. The yields’ of the char was obtained by measuring the weight of the char and then divided by the starting weight of the coal sample. The condensable products yields were obtained in similar manner as the char. The yield of the gaseous product was obtained by subtracting the sum of yields of char and condensable products from unity. The yields of semi-coke, water and tar were 63, 11, and 7%, respectively. The tar obtained was characterize using GC/MS to determine the chemical composition. The characterization was carried out using Agilent Gas Chromatography/ Mass Selective Detector (GC/MSD). The GC/MSD results show that the dominant compounds in the tar are aromatic, acid, and esters. However sulphur, nitrogen, chlorine, and fluorine compounds were present. The specific dominant compound is Benzeneacetic acid, 4-tetradecyl ester, (C22H36O2) about 33%, and the least were 1H-Thiopine, 2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-4,5-didehydro-3,3,6,6-tetramethyl (C10H16OS), 1-oxide, 4-(2,5-Dihydro-3-methoxyphenyl)butylamine (C11H19NO) about 6%. The coal may serve as feedstock for production of coke and aromatic compounds.
Keywords
Maiganga Coal, Yield, Agilent GC/MSD, Aromatic, Benzene Acetic Acid 4-Tetradecyl Ester
To cite this article
Habu Iyodo Mohammed, Ali Lawan Yaumi, Alhaji Shehu Grema, Murtala Musa Ahmed, Abubakar M ohammed El-Jummah, Experimental Study of Destructive Distillation of Maiganga Coal: Analysis of Products’ Yield and Composition, American Journal of Chemical Engineering. Vol. 7, No. 6, 2019, pp. 135-140. doi: 10.11648/j.ajche.20190706.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
A. Nyakuma, Bemgba B., Jauro A., “Physicochemical Characterization and Thermal Decomposition of Maiganga Coal,” De Gruyter, vol. LXII, no. 3, pp. 6–11, 2016.
[2]
A. Babagana, U. Abdullahi, J. M. El-nafaty, and M. Gado, “Quality Assessment of Coal Deposits around Molko Area,” J. Appl. Geol. Geophys., vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 101–110, 2017.
[3]
L. J. Mudashiru, “Suitability Assessment of Kurumu, Garin-maiganga, Gindi- akwati and Ogboyoba Coal Deposit Properties for Power Generation Suitability Assessment of Kurumu, Garin-maiganga, Gindi- akwati and Ogboyoba Coal Deposit Properties for Power Generation,” 2016.
[4]
M. Chukwu, C. O. Folayan, G. Y. Pam, and D. O. Obada, “Characterization of Some Nigerian Coals for Power Generation,” J. Combust., vol. 2016, no. 9728278, pp. 1–11, 2016.
[5]
U. S. Onoduku, “Chemistry of Maiganga Coal Deposit, Upper Benue,” vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 80–84, 2014.
[6]
Q. Nie, Fan, Meng, Tao, Zhang, “Pyrolysis of Low-Rank Coal: From Research to Practice,” in Pyrolysis, 2017, pp. 319–339.
[7]
B. Yang and L. Wang, “Review of advance on coal pyrolysis mechanism,” J. Chem. Pharm. Res., vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 421–423, 2014.
[8]
H. S. V. Kramer, Robert A, Liberty Pelter, “Enhancing Coke Production Energy Efficiency While Reducing Emissions,” in AISTech 2011 Conference Proceedings, 2011, pp. 1–12.
[9]
A. Raðenoviæ, “Pyrolysis of Coal,” Piroliza ugljena, Kem. Ind, vol. 55, no. 7–8, pp. 311–319, 2006.
[10]
P. R. Solomon and M. A. Serio, “Progress in Coal Pyrolysis Research,” 1993.
[11]
Y. D. Y. and S. V. P. Vijayaragavan, Krishnamoorthy, “Influence of Pyrolysis Gas on Volatile Yield and CO2 Reaction Kinetics of the Char Samples Generated in,” Energies, 2018.
[12]
T. Takafumi, Kawamura, Shigeru, Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro, Sakawa, Hiyoruku, Kozuru, Hiroshi, Lida, “Study on Coal Flash Pyrolysis,” 1993.
[13]
M. N. Amin, Y. Li, and X. Lu, “In Situ Catalytic Pyrolysis of Low-Rank Coal for the Conversion of Heavy Oils into Light Oils,” Adv. Mater. Sci. Eng., vol. 2017, no. 561252, pp. 1–8, 2017.
[14]
J. N. Brown, “Development of a lab-scale auger reactor for biomass fast pyrolysis and process optimization using response surface methodology by,” Iowa State University, 2009.
[15]
Z. Ying, Xu, Guoji, Zhang, Lei, Chen, Xiaokuo, Ding and Yongfa, “Pyrolysis Products Properties from Lignite,” Asian J. Chem., vol. 25, no. 9, pp. 4828–4832, 2013.
[16]
N. Herminé, Non-fuel uses of coal. London, 2014.
[17]
A. L. Yaumi, H. I. Mohammed, A. S. Grema, A. M. El-jummah, and M. M. Ahmed, “Simulation of Flash Pyrolysis of Maiganga Coal Using Modified Straight First Order Reaction Model,” Res. J. Chem. Eng. Process., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 2–7, 2019.
[18]
S. A. Ryemshak, A. Jauro, J. D. Putshaka, and R. M. Sori, “Ultimate Analysis of some Nigerian coal : Ranking and Suitable Application,” Int. J. Eng. Appl. Sci., vol. 3, no. 10, pp. 31–35, 2016.
[19]
B. B. Nyakuma, “Oxidative Thermal Analysis of Nigerian Coals," J. Ener. Env., 4 (1), 2-5, 2012.
Browse journals by subject